MMF Daily Message – October 6, 2020

Indigenous Peoples Open Doors
Program with the Manitoba Metis Federation

What is the Indigenous Open Doors Program with the Manitoba Metis Federation?

Parks Canada and the Manitoba Metis Federation (MMF) are proud to announce that MMF citizens are being offered free access to Lower Fort Garry and Riel House national historic sites.

Parks Canada’s Indigenous Peoples Open Doors Program provides ease of access, by removing entry fees, to people who have traditional ties with Parks Canada sites as a way of encouraging their reconnection to these heritage places.

The Manitoba Metis Federation shares in the traditional connection that Metis people of Manitoba have with the lands and waters comprising Lower Fort Garry and Riel House national historic sites.

How does it work?
To gain complimentary entry to Lower Fort Garry and Riel House, citizens of the Manitoba Metis Community are requested to present their MMF Citizenship or Harvester Card. With presentation of either of these cards, Parks Canada will provide Metis citizens with free entry for the duration of their visit.

Do I need to go to the Visitor Centre to get free entry?
Yes, you need to stop at the Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site Visitor Centre or connect with Parks Canada staff at Riel House National Historic Site to get free access to the site. This may mean waiting in the line-up with other visitors. Upon presenting your MMF Citizenship or Harvester Card, you will receive free entry for the duration of your visit.

Do I need to pay for special activities and programs?
The Indigenous Peoples Open Doors Program with the MMF provides free entry to Lower Fort Garry and Riel House national historic sites. Other fees for attractions and services, including tours, workshops and special programming, or any other levies associated with park/site/area use, other than entry, still apply.

Can I hunt or practice traditional activities at the sites?
The Indigenous Peoples Open Doors Program does not authorize the bearer to, among other things, hunt, fish, trap, harvest plants and natural objects, or remove cultural objects within the National Historic Site.[1]

How long will the Program be in effect?
The Indigenous Peoples Open Doors Program at Lower Fort Garry and Riel House national historic sites with the Manitoba Metis Federation started on May 28, 2020 with no expiry date.

When will I be able to access the sites?

The health and safety of visitors, employees and all Canadians is of the utmost importance and Parks Canada is following the advice of public health experts and continues to make every effort to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Both Lower Fort Garry and Riel House national historic sites have recently closed for the 2020 season, however will be open once again to visitors in spring 2021. Visitors are asked to plan ahead by checking the Parks Canada website before they travel to find out: what is open, what they can expect and how to prepare for their visit.


[1] Hunt and trap, as defined in the National Parks Wildlife Regulations

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!
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